How to Transition Summer Clothes into Fall Outfits

Fall is here and as you stare aimlessley into your closet you realize that you aren’t as Fall stock-heavy as you wish you were. The simple answer is to use Summer pieces for the Fall time. Against the fashion law, you say? Not if you wear it right. Let’s begin!

Adding printed, black, or colored tights to Summer skater skirts and dresses make it appropriate for Fall. Knit tights or adding thigh-high socks to the tights are perfect ways to stay comfy and chic. Adding on a leather jacket or combat boots creates a more grunge feel to a dainty outfit. Wearing sheer colored tights with shorts allows you to wear those must-have Summer shorts in the Fall!

Layering a patterned or solid print scarf to any Summer tee or light-weight cardigan will keep you warm and fashionable all day. Cotton-blend scarves can be worn during the Summer and Fall because of their thin material. For extra warmth, go for the knit and thicker scarves.

Those Summer crop tops are easily paired with over-sized sweaters and high-waisted jeans for a cozy feel. A pop of color in the shoes make the look seem interesting instead of fading into neutral Fall patterns. Chunky sweaters are a must for Fall due to their versatility.

Blending Fall items with Summer pieces is the best way to make the outfit work. A Fall deep colored blazer with a pastel top, dark bag, and light colored accessories balances each other out. Using Summer items during the Fall is the best way to get use out of your entire closet year-round.

 

DIY~ Sweater Beanies for Fall

We all have those embarrassing sweaters hidden away in the back of our closets. Those holiday or stripped sweaters that make you want to burn any picture you were taken of it in. No need to worry any more! This DIY takes those unwanted sweaters and turns them into adorable head wear. Beanies are essential for those cold fall and winter months. Let’s begin!

This old sweater has been in my closet for years and may look fashionable, but is very unflattering to any shape. Other than that you will need a sewing machine, preferably with a denim needle to accommodate the thick fabric, sewing needle and coordinating thread, ruler, scissors, and sewing pins. If you don’t have a sewing machine then you can sew by hand, but it will take longer than just using a machine.

Cut a rectangle from the sweater, measuring about 12 inches (30.48 cm) wide and 17 inches (43.18 cm) long. This takes into account a beanie that is folded up about 1 inch (2.53 cm) at the bottom. You can decrease or increase the measurements, if needed. Along those lines, you can always not fold up the bottom of your beanie, or fold up a greater amount than I did. Depending on the type of sweater you are using, you can use the finished bottom edge for the bottom edge of your beanie. Some sweaters have a stretchy bottom, while others don’t.

Fold the sweater rectangle in half, lengthwise. Make sure the “front” sides are facing each other (unless of course, the stitching is the same on both sides of your sweater). Pin along the edge.

Sew along this edge. Adjust the tension/settings on your sewing machine so that you can sew the largest, loosest stitch possible. Also change your settings to a straight stitch.

Sew a straight stitch all around the top of the sweater “tube”, about .5 inch (1.27 cm) from the top edge.  Remember that you aren’t sewing the 2 layers together – just a straight stitch all around, on a single layer. Technically, you’re not sewing anything to anything. This stitch will be used to gather the fabric at the top. Tip: When you are sewing around the top and come back to the point where you started, make sure the stitch doesn’t actually meet at the ends. This will make it easier to pull and gather the thread at the next step.

Carefully pull the thread and gather the material together. With some adjusting and pulling, the fabric will eventually bunch. Tie and cut off the thread.

Adjust the settings on your sewing machine back to normal/the settings you were using before. Sew a straight stitch directly under the bunched up fabric. Tie off the thread, and cut the excess.

Turn the beanie right side out. The top of the beanie will have a bunched effect. If you decide to fold up the bottom of the beanie, you can hand sew a few stitches to keep the fold in place. Adding clear nail polish or top-coat on edges will prevent fraying.

And that’s all! If you wanted to add more pizazz then buying jewels or iron-on designs are an easy fix. Apply jewels with fabric glue and let it dry for 4-5 hours. Another way to personalize it is to dip-dye or solid dye the beanie. Dip it in bleach for dip-dye or colored dye and wash it out to prevent bleeding through. Sewing a fluffy pom-pom on the top of the beanie can create a more laid-back fall look. This beanie only cost $2 for extra thread and pins compared to the Asos.com beanie below costing $15.00.

 

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